Dysfunctional posttraumatic cognitions: Can we reduce the gap between research and practice?

Anke de Haan A new guestpost!

Anke de Haan from the University Children’s Hospital in Zurich talks about the place that children’s post-trauma cognitions have in clinical practice:

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Posttraumatic cognitions have been a topic in child trauma research for a few years now. Nevertheless, my impression is that they have not yet been established in clinical practice.

Why not? Are they not practically relevant? Are they too difficult to assess? Before I discuss these questions, I will briefly describe what I mean with dysfunctional posttraumatic cognitions. Continue reading

One family in Gaza

Images and voices say a lot more than the written word, especially when it comes to trauma. One of the most impressive, touching videos that I have seen on trauma is this one:

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A few months after the 2008/9 Israeli attack that killed over 1000 Palestinian people, filmmaker Jen Marlowe visited Gaza. Among the many families she met and the stories she heard, one family stood out. In the video she shows the story of Kamal and Wafaa Awajah and their children. As Marlowe writes:

Wafaa described the execution of their son, Ibrahim. As she spoke, her children played on the rubble of their destroyed home. Kamal talked about struggling to help his kids heal from trauma.

Palestinians in Gaza are depicted either as violent terrorists or as helpless victims. The Awajah family challenges both portrayals. Through one family’s story, the larger tragedy of Gaza is exposed, and the courage and resilience of its people shines through.

Take your time to watch, it is a powerful reminder of why we work in the trauma field.

 

Get attention for your online survey

mental health surveySomething new on the blog: Have your online survey posted!

The new Surveys page will show current online questionnaires on trauma recovery and related topics.

Many thanks to guestblogger Betty Lai for asking me whether I could promote her current online research (see below). It seemed so obvious that we should have a page for that. Continue reading

Youth consultation when planning for emergencies

Australia has experienced a number of large disasters in the past few years. Examples are the extensive floods in Queensland in 2011 and the deadly bushfires in 2009. Susan Davie works in government emergency management and is a big advocate for engaging youth in the planning process. She shares her impressions of a pilot youth consultation.

One of the gaps in emergency management (EM) planning in Australia is the lack of consultation with young people. In essence young people do not have a voice, even though there is no doubt that children and young people are affected by disasters and emergency events. They do have specific needs, from child toilets in evacuation facilities to youth-centered psychosocial interventions.

Health and Human Services Emergency Management in Victoria is currently coordinating a project on planning for children and young people in emergency management.[i] As part of this project, we just undertook a pilot youth consultation in the Macedon Ranges Shire, a beautiful area at about an hour’s drive from Melbourne. The local committee was keen to hear the thoughts and ideas of young people and integrate them in their emergency management plans. Continue reading

Trauma and PTSD experts on Twitter

Are you looking for experts on traumatic stress, PTSD, or trauma recovery on Twitter? Below is a list of active ‘twexperts’ who are members of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) or affiliated national societies. To follow the whole list at once, including a few less active members, see this link.

 

 

 

Hopefully, more and more ISTSS members will become enthusiastic social media users soon. Twitter is a fantastic platform for making connections, brainstorming, and sharing information. Would you like to start with Twitter? Find some good advice here (Twitter’s tips) and here (LSE Impact Blog’s tips).

Experts who have tweeted at least once in the past two months, with their Twitter bio: Continue reading