Children in the ambulance: how do paramedics go about psychosocial care?

“The beer they gave Casper in the ambulance, calmed him down” she says.

The presenter is recounting the story of a boy who broke his leg in a swimming pool accident.

What? Is alcohol the latest innovation in professional care for children?

It keeps the audience in suspense for a while. Until it turns out presenter meant to say (teddy) ‘bear’, not ‘beer’. That presenter was me by the way 🙂 we had a good laugh about it.

Ambulance staff are often the first at the scene when a child is seriously injured. What do they know about children’s stress reactions? Have they had any training in psychological first aid? And how confident are they about providing it? Continue reading

Curbing Social Climate Change with a cup of tea

curbing-social-climate-change-with-a-cup-of-teaEntie metzawzje?’ The dreaded question – Are you married?

‘Yes,’ I lie, ‘but I don’t have children.’

Naima frowns: ‘Leesh?’ Why?

 

That’s always hard to explain. I want to create something positive, and I love children. I simply never felt the desire to have my own.

I’m sitting on a family porch in Amman, Jordan. I’ve just had dinner but Naima and her family bring out bowls of olives, nuts, and dates. They ask about my life and work. Unfortunately my Arabic is not good enough to answer in depth. I promise to be better prepared next time.

It was a special encounter with this family. I saw care and curiosity. I felt welcome, even though our background and life choices are so different.

Social climate change

Brexit, the US elections, and the daily news all point to more division in our society. We see an enormous human toll in Syria. At the same time, we talk about refugees as ‘illegal border crossers’ and terrorists who need be kept out. There are real dangers that make it impossible to dismiss the latter point entirely, but I struggle with our intolerance towards people who are different from us.

We develop our own truths, depending on our environments, friends, and whether we read the New York Times or the conservative National Review. We seem to live in different universes, while actually, there are still so many things that we share. Continue reading

Impressions from 2 refugee camps in Jordan: Zaatari and Azraq

What is a refugee camp like? How are children living and learning there? And is there anything that I can do to support? These questions are still floating through my mind – it would be arrogant and naïve to expect easy answers – but I have at least some frame of reference now. I’ve just returned from Jordan, where I visited two camps. Continue reading

Posttraumatic stress disorder a greater risk in rich countries

By New Zealand Defence Force from Wellington New ZealandOne would think that people with few friends and living in poverty are more at risk for PTSD than those with a strong support network and many resources.

And that’s true.

However, it is a different story when you look at the country-, rather than the individual level. Countries with more resources, such as the USA and the Netherlands, have higher levels of PTSD than countries with fewer resources (e.g. Colombia, South Africa).

This is the key finding of our latest study, which has just been published in the British Journal of Psychiatry. For the analyses, we made use of international data on trauma exposure, PTSD and country vulnerability. They had been collected in 24 different studies, published between 2005 and 2014.

The information on exposure and PTSD came from one, well-established and (evidently) widely used measure, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The country resources, or vulnerability, information came from the annual World Risk Report. It includes a mix of country characteristics, such as number of hospital beds, malnutrition, and gross domestic product per capita.

Both trauma exposure and vulnerability were major determinants of PTSD, but the latter in an unexpected way. While a higher percentage of trauma exposure in the country related to higher levels of PTSD, more vulnerability was associated with less PTSD.

Michel Dückers, the lead author of the study, calls it the “vulnerability paradox”. Continue reading

Dysfunctional posttraumatic cognitions: Can we reduce the gap between research and practice?

Anke de Haan A new guestpost!

Anke de Haan from the University Children’s Hospital in Zurich talks about the place that children’s post-trauma cognitions have in clinical practice:

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Posttraumatic cognitions have been a topic in child trauma research for a few years now. Nevertheless, my impression is that they have not yet been established in clinical practice.

Why not? Are they not practically relevant? Are they too difficult to assess? Before I discuss these questions, I will briefly describe what I mean with dysfunctional posttraumatic cognitions. Continue reading