Trauma research must be Open Access

Open_Access_logo_PLoS_transparentWe recently examined how global and how open the literature on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is.

Not very global, and not very open.

Only 13% of the publications of 2012 regarded samples in low- or middle-income countries and 58% were behind a paywall.

Today I want to talk about the latter, the paywall part.

It worries me that practicing psychologists can’t access the latest research on therapy effectiveness. Or on how to deal with drop-out from clinical interventions. Or on how children experience trauma recovery.

As you may know, the migration crisis and refugees are on my mind a lot these days. I can’t justify, in any way, why a large part of the relevant knowledge is unavailable to support those who are affected.

Not only practitioners have little access to the latest evidence. The same applies to many scholars in low-resource settings, policy makers, and citizens in general.

Much research is behind a paywall, even though it was funded with public money. This system is lucrative for the publishers of certain ‘traditional journals’, which charge extra-ordinary amounts of subscription money to university libraries.

Getting radical

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